Zelda Phantom Hourglass blog post 3

(We’re supposed to make blog entries for class and I’d figure I’d post it here as well to link to since the page was all stretched and annoying on the class blog…)

I had quite the scare when I booted up my game, what I saw was this, the same scene from the beginning:

I didn’t press the “erase” button, did I?! I don’t want to restart and go through the tutorial again al;skdjflakdjalkdsfja. Oh, wait. That was only a flashback thing? Okay, whew. 

I think this was an interesting way to remind the player what Link’s mission is and why he’s going through all these dangerous things. I believe this is from Link’s imagination because given Tetra’s brash and confident demeanor, I don’t think she would in reality let herself seem so helpless. It reminds the player of how pertinent the adventure is and perhaps encourages them to make haste in completing the mission. But, as I said earlier, it’s up to the player to mold Link’s personality, and my Link is easily distracted and enjoys stopping to pick dandelions along the way.

And by dandelions I mean catching fish and customizing the boat to look pretty!

So far the story seems to be falling pretty well into the 3 Act Structure. The inciting incident was when Tetra jumped onto the Ghost Ship, screamed and was taken away by the Ghost Ship. Plot point numero uno is when Link and Linebeck first set sail and go to the Isle of Ember, because this game revolves around sailing and finding different islands that hold different clues as to the whereabouts of the Ghost Ship. I’m not sure if I’ve reached the first culmination yet, because I certainly haven’t reached the midpoint yet. The first culmination could possibly be completing the Temple of Fire and finding the Spirit of Power who is now accompanying me.

I imagine the midpoint will involve something about being stranded on an island without Linebeck’s ship, because he betrays you. Plot Point 2 might involve him coming back to you. The climax will be finding the Ghost Ship and the ensuing final battle. And the denouement will be “yay! Tetra was saved and everything’s back to normal, and Linebeck is joining Tetra’s pirate crew!” That is all conjecture, I could be completely wrong.

This picture is very much a good depiction of the character dynamics thus far in the game. Linebeck is not very good at hiding the fact he is using Link to do all the hard kill-all-the-baddies-and-go-through-all-the-temples work. He simply wants to find the Ghost Ship because he wants the treasure that’s supposedly on it. Ciela is often angrily pointing this out. And Link is presumably putting up with it just because he needs Linebeck for his ship. 

thefrogman:

afternoonsnoozebutton:

I’ll be blacking out my blog tomorrow in protest of SOPA/PIPA legislation. To learn more about what I’m protesting or the internet blackout, keep reading:

“What is SOPA?
The Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA, H.R.  3261) is on the surface a bill that attempts to curb online piracy.  Sadly, the proposed way it goes about doing this would devastate the  online economy and the overall freedom of the web. It would particularly  affect sites with heavy user generated content. Sites like Youtube,  Reddit, Twitter, and others may cease to exist in their current form if  this bill is passed.
What is PIPA?
The Protect IP Act (PIPA, S. 968) is  SOPA’s twin in the Senate. Under current DMCA law, if a user uploads a  copyrighted movie to sites like Youtube, the site isn’t held accountable  so long as they provide a way to report user infringement. The user who  uploaded the movie is held accountable for their actions, not the site.  PIPA would change that - it would place the blame on the site itself,  and would also provide a way for copyright holders to seize the site’s  domain in extreme circumstances.
The Electronic Frontier Foundation laid out four  excellent points as to why the bills are not only dangerous, but are  also not effective for what they are trying to accomplish:
The blacklist bills are expensive. The Congressional Budget Office has estimated that PIPA alone would  cost the taxpayers at least $47 million over 5 years, and could cost the  private sector many times more. Those costs would be carried mostly by  the tech industry, hampering growth and innovation.
The blacklist bills silence legitimate speech. Rightsholders, ISPs, or the government could shut down sites with accusations of infringement, and without real due process.
The blacklist bills are bad for the architecture of the Internet. But don’t take our word for it: see the open letters that dozens of the  Internet’s concerned creators have submitted to Congress about the  impact the bills would have on the security of the web.
The blacklist bills won’t stop online piracy. The tools these bills would grant rightsholders are like chainsaws in  an operating room: they do a lot of damage, and they aren’t very  effective in the first place. The filtering methods might dissuade  casual users, but they would be trivial for dedicated and technically  savvy users to circumvent.”

(from sopablackout.org/Yes, readers, you’ll still be able to access the site/content. You’ll just have to click through the blackout screen first.)

It’s midnight here in St. Louis. I’m going dark. See you guys on Thursday. 

thefrogman:

afternoonsnoozebutton:

I’ll be blacking out my blog tomorrow in protest of SOPA/PIPA legislation. To learn more about what I’m protesting or the internet blackout, keep reading:

“What is SOPA?

The Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA, H.R. 3261) is on the surface a bill that attempts to curb online piracy. Sadly, the proposed way it goes about doing this would devastate the online economy and the overall freedom of the web. It would particularly affect sites with heavy user generated content. Sites like Youtube, Reddit, Twitter, and others may cease to exist in their current form if this bill is passed.

What is PIPA?

The Protect IP Act (PIPA, S. 968) is SOPA’s twin in the Senate. Under current DMCA law, if a user uploads a copyrighted movie to sites like Youtube, the site isn’t held accountable so long as they provide a way to report user infringement. The user who uploaded the movie is held accountable for their actions, not the site. PIPA would change that - it would place the blame on the site itself, and would also provide a way for copyright holders to seize the site’s domain in extreme circumstances.

The Electronic Frontier Foundation laid out four excellent points as to why the bills are not only dangerous, but are also not effective for what they are trying to accomplish:

  • The blacklist bills are expensive. The Congressional Budget Office has estimated that PIPA alone would cost the taxpayers at least $47 million over 5 years, and could cost the private sector many times more. Those costs would be carried mostly by the tech industry, hampering growth and innovation.
  • The blacklist bills silence legitimate speech. Rightsholders, ISPs, or the government could shut down sites with accusations of infringement, and without real due process.
  • The blacklist bills are bad for the architecture of the Internet. But don’t take our word for it: see the open letters that dozens of the Internet’s concerned creators have submitted to Congress about the impact the bills would have on the security of the web.
  • The blacklist bills won’t stop online piracy. The tools these bills would grant rightsholders are like chainsaws in an operating room: they do a lot of damage, and they aren’t very effective in the first place. The filtering methods might dissuade casual users, but they would be trivial for dedicated and technically savvy users to circumvent.”
(from sopablackout.org/Yes, readers, you’ll still be able to access the site/content. You’ll just have to click through the blackout screen first.)

It’s midnight here in St. Louis. I’m going dark. See you guys on Thursday. 

This is an interesting blog post by the developers The Game Bakers in which they overview the financial side of iOS games. We all know about the success of games such as Angry Birds and Fruit Ninja, which both have made quite a bit of money. But what about all the other games that are nowhere near the same sales figures? That’s what this article addresses, looking into many games including an overview of their own Squids. Definitely a good read for anyone thinking of going into indie game development. 

This is an interesting blog post by the developers The Game Bakers in which they overview the financial side of iOS games. We all know about the success of games such as Angry Birds and Fruit Ninja, which both have made quite a bit of money. But what about all the other games that are nowhere near the same sales figures? That’s what this article addresses, looking into many games including an overview of their own Squids. Definitely a good read for anyone thinking of going into indie game development. 

For the past few days I’ve been addicted to Picross 3d, which is a lovely puzzle game for the DS. I find it’s a great way to wind down before bed, although that might change when I inevitably reach the harder and potentially frustrating puzzles. It’s a simple thing really, but I find that half my amusement in this game is trying to figure out what object I’m slowly whittling out of this nondescript grey block. 

This same satisfaction is not completely unlike that my 8 year old self felt each time I uncovered and therefore rescued a baby ball thing (?) in Tetrisphere

tl;dr I like puzzle games where you blow up blocks in order to uncover things. Or I just find blowing things up to be fun

Forgot to post this earlier, but Indie Game: The Movie is going to be shown at the Sundance Film Festival! This documentary is about the creation of video games, that follows the makers of Braid, Super Meat Boy and Fez in particular. 
It looks like it will be an amazing film and I’m so happy to see that it’s going to be featured at Sundance. Just like the recent Grammy awarded to a song from Civilization IV, I think this is another step for video games being recognized as an art form. 

Forgot to post this earlier, but Indie Game: The Movie is going to be shown at the Sundance Film Festival! This documentary is about the creation of video games, that follows the makers of Braid, Super Meat Boy and Fez in particular. 

It looks like it will be an amazing film and I’m so happy to see that it’s going to be featured at Sundance. Just like the recent Grammy awarded to a song from Civilization IV, I think this is another step for video games being recognized as an art form. 

I haven’t played much of it yet (since I’m procrastinating from studying and need to get back to it) but I just wanted to point out how visually stunning this game, Voxatron that is included in the Humble Indie Bundle (2 days left!). The aesthetics are certainly what makes this game. So far there isn’t anything very unique about the gameplay, it’s certainly fun, but that’s not what makes this game stand out.
There’s something really satisfying about seeing the environment around you actually being affected by your battles by slowly being destroyed. This is probably the most detailed environment damage I’ve seen in a game (granted it’s a stylized aesthetic as opposed to realistic graphics, however that’s precisely why they were able to make it work) 

I haven’t played much of it yet (since I’m procrastinating from studying and need to get back to it) but I just wanted to point out how visually stunning this game, Voxatron that is included in the Humble Indie Bundle (2 days left!). The aesthetics are certainly what makes this game. So far there isn’t anything very unique about the gameplay, it’s certainly fun, but that’s not what makes this game stand out.

There’s something really satisfying about seeing the environment around you actually being affected by your battles by slowly being destroyed. This is probably the most detailed environment damage I’ve seen in a game (granted it’s a stylized aesthetic as opposed to realistic graphics, however that’s precisely why they were able to make it work) 

I just heard about this upcoming survival horror game, Amy, and I’m really excited about it! 
The game takes place in 2034 in a small US midwestern town where there was this virus outbreak essentially turning people into zombies. This game seems like it will be vastly different than all those other zombie games out there: the focus here is on the story.This story centers around Lana, who is actually infected herself, however in the presence of this young autistic girl, Amy, the virus is repressed in her. The two must work together in order to survive this ordeal. Not unlike Ico, there will be a hand-holding mechanic in the game, where the player will be able to ‘feel’ Amy’s heartbeat via the rumble of the controller. The faster the heart beat, the greater the present danger. Another interesting gameplay feature is that when separated from Amy, Lana will progressively become more zombie-esque and will actually be able to slip through groups of zombies unnoticed. 
In an interview with Edge, Paul Cuisset had this to say: “…I am quite sick of all the games where you have only combat and nothing else. A good story needs good characters, and good characters need good relations to build something. I think that we tend to forget that we can do something different in games – it needn’t only be shooting and action games, we can also tell stories.”
It seems like it’ll be a very poignent story; I’m definitely going to buy it when it comes out. 
edit: haha, so I definitely lied in this post because after I saw the extremely poor reviews it received I didn’t want to buy it. Good idea, looks like it wasn’t executed that well though…

I just heard about this upcoming survival horror game, Amy, and I’m really excited about it! 

The game takes place in 2034 in a small US midwestern town where there was this virus outbreak essentially turning people into zombies. This game seems like it will be vastly different than all those other zombie games out there: the focus here is on the story.This story centers around Lana, who is actually infected herself, however in the presence of this young autistic girl, Amy, the virus is repressed in her. The two must work together in order to survive this ordeal. Not unlike Ico, there will be a hand-holding mechanic in the game, where the player will be able to ‘feel’ Amy’s heartbeat via the rumble of the controller. The faster the heart beat, the greater the present danger. Another interesting gameplay feature is that when separated from Amy, Lana will progressively become more zombie-esque and will actually be able to slip through groups of zombies unnoticed. 

In an interview with Edge, Paul Cuisset had this to say: “…I am quite sick of all the games where you have only combat and nothing else. A good story needs good characters, and good characters need good relations to build something. I think that we tend to forget that we can do something different in games – it needn’t only be shooting and action games, we can also tell stories.”

It seems like it’ll be a very poignent story; I’m definitely going to buy it when it comes out. 

edit: haha, so I definitely lied in this post because after I saw the extremely poor reviews it received I didn’t want to buy it. Good idea, looks like it wasn’t executed that well though…

Never before have I been so terrified of an ripples in water before. I played some Amnesia last night, and man my nerves are not cut out for such a game. The designers in this game were brilliant in designing a truly terrifying experience mostly due to two reasons: making the player feel powerless, and by largely leaving the monsters up to the players’ imaginations. 
I mean this water… demon…thing… is completely invisible yet it induced so much fear because I knew as soon as I touched water it would sense me and that ominous splash of water would soon be right behind me. I like that they made it move in successive circular splashes, instead of having a continual ripple. Something about the rhythm of the splash and seeing and knowing it’s coming towards you is so unnerving. 

Never before have I been so terrified of an ripples in water before. I played some Amnesia last night, and man my nerves are not cut out for such a game. The designers in this game were brilliant in designing a truly terrifying experience mostly due to two reasons: making the player feel powerless, and by largely leaving the monsters up to the players’ imaginations. 

I mean this water… demon…thing… is completely invisible yet it induced so much fear because I knew as soon as I touched water it would sense me and that ominous splash of water would soon be right behind me. I like that they made it move in successive circular splashes, instead of having a continual ripple. Something about the rhythm of the splash and seeing and knowing it’s coming towards you is so unnerving. 

"I don’t really have the education, jacket, or fedora to properly interpret ambiguous ancient carvings."
Oh Guybrush Threepwood, how I’ve missed your witticisms. 

"I don’t really have the education, jacket, or fedora to properly interpret ambiguous ancient carvings."

Oh Guybrush Threepwood, how I’ve missed your witticisms.